Rape & Date Rape


Rape And Date Rape



What Is Rape?


Rape is unwanted sexual intercourse forced upon either men or women. People often think of rape with a mental image of a stranger jumping out of the bushes and sexually assaulting someone. The reality is, however, that 73% of the people who are raped actually know their attacker!

What Is Date Rape?


When forced sex occurs between people who know each other, it is called date or acquaintance rape. Even if two people are dating and in an intimate relationship, no one has the right to force sex upon another against his or her will; and no one ever owes the other person sex, regardless of their relationship.

When Sex Is Forced Against Someone's Will... That's Rape!!


Date rape is most prevalent on college campuses and also happening in high schools. Statistics show that one in four college girls has been forced physically, verbally, actively, or implicitly, to be engaged in sex. Surveys have found that 90% knew their attackers, and 1 in 15 college guys admitted to having forced a woman to have sex.

On many occasions the guy may decide that the girl is just playing hard to get and really means yes, even though she's saying no. The bottom line is, yes means yes; and no means NO. If a person says no and is still forced to have sex, then a rape has occurred.

Sometimes a victim of date rape may not view it as an actual rape, as they were drinking; and friends might say, Well, what did you expect? Or, if they were dating anyway, she may get comments like, So what's the big deal? Or perhaps the guy was drinking and says, Hey, it was just a mistake. Then again, the girl may not want to get the guy into trouble, especially if they were friends or dating. Minimizing the rape itself, however, will do nothing for either person, as the girl will still have to deal with the trauma; and the guy will feel that if he got away with it once, he can do it again.

Who Are The Victims Of Rape?


1 in 6 women (and 1 in 33 men) will be sexually assaulted in her/his lifetime.
College age girls are 4 times more likely to be sexually assaulted.
Every 2 minutes someone in the U.S. is sexually assaulted.
60% of assaults are not reported to police.
73% of rape victims know their assailants.

Date Rape Drugs


GHB, rohypnol, and ketamine are commonly known as the "date rape drugs." These drugs can be slipped into drinks and cause blurred vision, blackouts, memory loss, and even death. The victim is completely helpless in these situations. They are the most powerful weapon a sexual predator can have. Oftentimes rapes can be committed and the victim is completely oblivious as to what actually occurred.

How Can I Avoid Being Raped


Avoid secluded places.
Go out in groups and take care of each other.
Stay sober and aware of your surroundings.
Follow your instincts and don't allow yourself to be alone with someone who makes you uneasy.
Don't be afraid to ask for help if you need it.
Be clear with what you want in a relationship.
Be aware of the date rape drugs:
    Don't accept a drink from someone you don't know.
    Never leave your drink unattended.
    When at parties, get your drinks in closed containers; i.e., bottles and cans.
    Don't let someone else get your drink for you.


What Do I Do If I Have Been Raped?

Rape doesn't just cause physical damage. The emotional trauma, called "rape trauma syndrome," can be equally damaging and debilitating. Someone who has been raped may have any number of emotions both immediately and later on. She may feel frightened, confused, angry, ashamed, embarrassed, degraded, depressed, nervous, anxious, etc., and want to withdraw from family and friends. Rape trauma syndrome can have side effects as well; such as, difficulty in concentrating, eating, sleeping, and carrying on your normal activities.

Whether you talk to someone immediately or some time later, the BEST thing you can do for yourself is to talk about your experience with a trained counselor in a safe environment. Keeping it all inside will only continue the pain, and seeking help is the only way to assure long-term healing.

There are three important things that a victim of rape should do... the sooner the better:

Know that the rape was NOT your fault.
Seek medical care.
Get help with your feelings.


As soon as possible, call a friend, family member, or someone you feel safe with and tell them what happened. Go to the hospital ER for medical care. Don't change your clothes or shower. They have trained staff to take care of someone who has been raped. If you want to report the rape, call the police right away and preserve all of the physical evidence. If you're not sure what to do, call your local rape crisis center. They're in your local phone book.

If you are a victim of a rape which occurred some time ago, it is still important to seek the help you need to heal from this event and be able to move on with your life without the shadow of the rape always in the background. You can call your local rape crisis center or the national toll free number at

1-800-522-7233

and speak with a trained counselor. They are available 24/7 and can maintain your anonymity, if you choose.